Homemade Pierogies

Pierogies

Pierogi ; also spelled perogi, pierogy, perogy, pierógi, pyrohy, pirogi, pyrogie, or pyrogy; are dumplings of unleavened dough – first boiled, then baked or fried usually in butter with onions.

I’m going to show you two ways of making cheese and potato pierogies. By hand and by using a simple Pierogi mold.  Printable recipe can be found at the bottom of the page.  I’m telling you now that I’m horrible with using detailed/technical terms about cooking.  I’m counting on everyone that tries this recipe to have had at least one home economics class under their belt (or spent some time in the kitchen with an aunt like I did).  You can use all different types of fillings (Google that shit), but around here we stick with the one we know and love.

Some quick points.

  • One person can make this, but it’s easier and faster if you make this recipe with someone.
  • Nobody makes pierogies for just one meal.  Have freezer bags handy because this recipe makes a lot. They freeze beautifully.
  • It’s not difficult, but it will take time.  I usually block out an afternoon when we make them.

Pierogies

Mix together the flour, margarine, salt and sour cream.  I use a pastry cutter because I’m fancy that way, but you can use a fork if you’re not a fancypants.

Pierogies

Hollow out the mixture and pour in the beaten eggs.  Add milk last.

Pierogies

DO NOT USE A MIXER. Use your hands. This is the part I hate, but it has to be done. Make sure you just mix it (don’t knead it)  – add flour as needed, but don’t go nuts.

Pierogies

When it’s all mixed together (so that it forms a nice ball) place a wet paper towel over it and let it rest for 10-15 minutes.

Pierogies

While the dough is resting make your mashed potatoes. If you’re using real mashed potatoes you should have them finished (with cheese added) before you start making the dough.

Pierogies

Mix the cheese in while the potatoes are still hot because you want it to melt.

Pierogies

Cheesey Potato Heaven.

Pierogies

Take a small amount of dough (leaving the rest covered with the wet paper towel) and roll it out.  Use a goblet (1970’s, baby) or another wide mouth glass/mug to cut out circles. Yes, I have a mess here. It happens.

Pierogies

Drop a heaping spoonful of the mashed potatoes in the middle of the dough.

Pierogies

Lightly brush water around the edges of the circle.

Pierogies

Fold over and pinch closed with a fork. Make sure they’re sealed or you’ll have a mess when you go to boil them.  When we make pierogies we usually lay them on a cookie sheet lined with wax paper as we go.  Then we put the entire cookie sheet in the freezer.  Rumor has it this is called flash-freezing.  Heh.  After they’ve hardened up, put them in freezer bags and freeze until ready to make.  The following  steps are used whether you’re cooking them fresh or frozen.

Pierogies

In a skillet, fry sliced onions with butter.  You can skip the onions if you’re like me and just melt butter in the skillet.

Pierogies

Drop the pierogies into boiling water – they’ll float to the top when they are done. Strain.  You CANNOT skip the boiling step.

Pierogies

Add them to the skillet with the butter and onions. Again, you can skip the onion part if you want, but don’t skip frying them in the butter.

Pierogies

A favorite meal at our house.  These bad boys are Eastern European peasant food and I love them!


Using a pierogi mold is a helluva lot faster than doing them by hand.

Pierogies

Flour your mold. Roll your dough out a little bit bigger than the size of your mold.

Pierogies

Lay the dough over the mold.

Pierogies

Fill with the cheese/mashed potatoes. Brush water all around

Pierogies

Roll out another layer of dough and place it over the mashed potatoes in the mold.

Pierogies

Run your rolling pin over the mold.

Pierogies

Lift off the excess dough (which can be used again).

Pierogies

Turn the mold over and plop them out onto a wax-paper lined cookie sheet.  Once the cookie sheet is filled up flash-freeze them.

Pierogies

I boiled these for lunch one day – straight from the freezer.

Pierogies

And it only took me a couple of minutes to fry them up.

Pierogies

And then I had a fabulous lunch. Did you notice how half of the pierogie is missing in this picture?  I couldn’t wait.

Pierogies re-heat in the microwave really well so don’t worry about making too many at one time (as if).

Homemade Pierogies
 
Original Source/Author:
: Dinner
Cuisine: Eastern European (peasant food)
Serves: A shit ton
Ingredients
  • Filling:
  • 8 cups mashed potatoes (already cooked instant or made with real potatoes)
  • 8 cups mild cheddar cheese (finely shredded)
  • Dough:
  • 6 cups flour
  • ½ stick (or ¼ cup) softened margarine
  • 1 pint (or 2 cups) sour cream
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 5 large eggs (slightly beaten)
  • ¼ cup milk
Instructions
  1. Start by making the mashed potatoes first (instant or real). When finished make sure you have 8 cups. Add the shredded cheese to the mashed potatoes while they're still hot. Stir until melted. Set aside.
  2. Measure flour into a large bowl. Add margarine, sour cream, salt. Mix together with pastry cutter or fork. Form a hollow in the flour mixture and pour in eggs. Add milk. Mix together with hands. Add more flour if needed. Don't knead the dough (this isn't bread/pizza dough). When it's mixed well, cover with damp towel and rest for 15 minutes.
  3. Working with small sections of the dough, roll out flat and cut into circles using a wide mouth glass/mug (or use a pierogie mold - see above). Put a heaping spoonful of the mashed potato mixture in the center of the dough circle. Lightly brush with water and fold the circle in half. Pinch with fork to seal. Drop in boiling water until they float then fry in a skillet with butter and onions.
  4. Can also be flash-frozen and placed in freezer bags. Making frozen is the same - just drop in boiling water until they float and then fry.

 


Comments

Homemade Pierogies — 19 Comments

  1. I was watching Martha Stewart’s Cooking School on PBS and she and a guest were making pasta. One of the tricks they used to make ravioli was to spritz the dough with a water bottle rather than brushing with water. Martha commented that it really speeded up the process. As I’ve never made anything that needed to be “sealed”, I can’t comment about how well it works, but I’ve got it in my playbook for the future.

  2. Are those Idahoan potatoes made with real hos? (come on, you know someone was going to ask!)

    Thanks for putting this up. May try it next time my brother and I are both at Mum’s so I have help.

    • It makes it go a lot faster if there are two of you (or more – I’m all about an assembly line). Put your brother to work (he’ll love you for it in the end).

    • I have photos taken and my recipe laying around here somewhere for our homemade ravioli. So much better than the kind you buy at the store. That’ll probably be my next big entry (because these are a pain in the ass).

  3. You realize this half-Polish chick has no excuse not to make these now? The husband loves all thing pierogi. Last November I brought a dozen back from Ohio with me from a place that makes them by hand.

    I was the best wife ever that night!

  4. Nommy. Love them (the mold is awesome) but geez I don’t have the patience. I’m with Robyn….I’ll just come visit.

  5. I’ve been waiting for this! Thx, now to find the time to make them. Besides the ones with cheese, I love fried onion/potato filling. Maybe I’ll try making half of each.

  6. I absolutely love perogies! They are one of my all time favorite foods to eat! Im so excited that found this recipe! It definitely looks like a lot of work but eh… im sure it will be worth the time in the end! Im sitting here stuck in the hospital, so looking up new recipes gives me comfort and you have given me tons of happiness and excitement for when I get to feeling better, i get to go home and try these! I have been stuck buying the frozen ones from the store and they are OK, but when I was just a kid my step brothers grandmother was from somewhere in Eastern Europe and she used to make the homemade for every Sunday dinner! I wish there was some way I could get her recipe and share it with you as you’ve shared yours! Hers were to die for and im sure from what I’ve read, yours are going to be just as delicious! Only thing different in going to do is make mine with real potatoes, only thing is, how many potatoes should I have to use in order to get 8 cups? I use the russet potatoes for my homemade mashed…. Does anyone have any ideas on how many to use? I just don’t want to end up with tons of extra potatoes that this recipe calls for.
    Also, how many does this make average and where can I buy one of these tools? And can you use it to make raviolis to? Sorry for all the questions lol.
    Im just a bit scared to try making this recipe. Im very good in the kitchen , but my fear is the dough part! I’ve been dying to try make homemade pasta, but I keep chickenin out! Lol

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